Thursday, September 8, 2016

5 Symptoms Not to Ignore with Your Pets





  • Ingestion of Human Medication

As little as a single Aleve tablet can be deadly.  As tempting as it may be to reach for the Aleve or Ibuprofen when we see our pets in pain, it is a terrible idea!  Aleve, Ibuprofen, Tylenol and even Asprin can be extremely dangerous and even deadly to pets.  These medications are also commonly flavored or encompassed in a sweet coating, making them even more tempting for our companions.  If you are concerned that your companion may have ingested any human medication, contact your veterinarian or the Pet Poison Hotline at 855-764-7661 immediately.



  • Unproductive Vomiting

A dog that appears to be gagging or vomiting but doesn’t produce anything is very concerning.  Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus (GDV), sometimes referred to as “Bloat” is one of the most serious non-traumatic emergencies we see.  This happens when the stomach or other part of the GI tract twists and reduces or stops the flow of blood.  If this issue is not addressed quickly, the pet can pass in a matter of hours.  The majority of pets with GDV require surgical intervention to restore bloodflow to their GI system.   Symptoms may include unproductive vomiting, restlessness, increased breathing rate or effort, excessive drooling, or listlessness.  As the condition progresses you many notice the dog’s abdomen becoming enlarged, pale gums, high heart rate or the pet collapsing.




  • Unproductive Urination

Pets that are struggling to urinate may be in more danger than you think.  Although this is most common in male cats, it is occasionally seen in other pets.  Male cats are notorious for having urethral obstructions that prevent them from urinating normally, or at all.  This can become a very serious issue the longer it is left untreated.  Often owners observe their pets trying to urinate frequently with out producing anything or only drips, in and out of the litter box often, or urinating inappropriately outside of the box.  Pet’s often express discomfort vocally or become reclusive and as the condition progresses begin vomiting and become lethargic. 





  • Ingestion of People Food

As pet owners, we love to share our food with our pets, especially when they show us those cute puppy dog eyes.  Be cautious what you share, because some foods can be toxic to our furry and feathered friends!  To top this list, Chocolate.  Chocolate is derived from the roasted seeds of Theobroma cacao, which contains certain properties that can be toxic to animals: caffeine and theobromine. If ingested, these two ingredients can also lead to various medical complications and may even prove fatal for your dog.  Goodies that contain higher amounts of cacao are most dangerous, such as dark chocolate bars and home made goodies.  For a list of other toxic foods, please visit http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control/people-foods-avoid-feeding-your-pets



  • Birds

Our feathered friends don’t often show when they are not feeling well.  As a prey species, they know if they are showing a vulnerability to a predator, they will be eaten.  This is an important piece of knowledge when caring for birds because once we realize they are not feeling well, it is a very serious situation.  Birds that are observed being ‘fluffed up’ or remaining on the bottom of their cage unusually should be seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible.

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